Close

The need for quick solutions.

If you think robots have to be impersonal and mechanical, Japanese robot venture GROOVE X wants you to think again. They created “Lovot,” a cuddly family robot. With more than 50 embedded sensors, it can analyze external stimuli, exhibit a variety of cute behaviors and human-like expressions, and nurture the users’ ability to love.

However, its appearance and intricate mechanism must be in perfect unity for it to work at its best, so the prototype development process for Lovot is particularly complicated. GROOVE X couldn’t outsource prototyping because designs change quickly and contractors would always be working with outdated data. “We needed a prototype system that enables quick review of designs that evolve on a daily basis,” said Kaname Hayashi, the CEO and founder of GROOVE X.
“With the 3D printers in our office, we can now review the designs and make adjustments in real time.”
Takamitsu Ikoma, product designer, GROOVE X
Stratasys 3D Printers Homepage
Perfecting surgical skills with Tissue Matrix

Real Challenge

As heart surgeries become increasingly intricate and complicated, planning patient-specific care for challenging cases has become more difficult using traditional methods. “When you are dealing with a complex situation where different organ systems are abnormal, each one needing its own specialist team with real-time decision making at the time of surgery, it becomes very difficult to coordinate, plan and make decisions,” said Rajesh Krishnamurthy, M.D., section chief of radiology research at Texas Children’s Hospital.
Not only LOVOT’s main unit, but also its larger charger is prototyped by a 3D printer.
Not only LOVOT’s main unit, but also its larger charger is prototyped by a 3D printer.

A future to smile about.

The GROOVE X team had such success with the Stratasys F370, they also added an F170™ 3D printer to cater to expanded business and operational needs. Both printers are helping them explore options to help Lovot best connect with humans and relate with a human touch. They’re using the printers to provide a wide variety of accessories, such as clothes, glasses, and horn/tail covers, so that Lovot users can customize the robots to their own preferences.

Exterior designer Sakura Yamamoto appreciates that Stratasys technology offers a colorful molding technique similar to pixel art that embeds a chip-like color bit inside the exterior of the transparent frame. Yamamoto can carefully monitor the color designs and expand the color variations without constraints. “It is fun to share our opinions to co-create various prototypes!”

The GROOVE X team now considers Stratasys 3D printing solutions to be integral to their development process. “With the 3D printers in our office, we can now review the designs and make adjustments in real time,” commented Ikoma.He plans to manufacture maintenance parts in-house with the 3D printers to reduce inventory risks, and he predicts that 3D printers will play an increasingly important role in the household robot market for years to come.
Download the case study
Download