Close

Impactful realism.

For the Centre for Biomedical and Technology Integration (CBMTI), a commercial spinoff of the University of Malaya in Malaysia, 3D printing is vital to innovation. CBMTI uses PolyJet technology to deliver a range of services including custom medical implants, prototypes for new devices and patient-specific models for surgical planning. But where CBMTI truly stands out is in creating clinically impactful, sophisticated training simulators.
“We find surgeons who train on these models are much better prepared in terms of dealing with complex surgeries.”
Yuwaraj Kumar Balakrishnan / Centre for Biomedical and Technology Integration
3D printed patient-specific models for surgical planning.

Industry leaders in medical modelling.

A recent program was developed to train surgeons on ear, nose and throat surgeries in collaboration with Professor Prepageran Narayanan from theUniversity of Malaysia.“When you use a 3D model with a tumor or lesion, it is very important to have color. Only if you see the color separation do you know that you’re in the right plane,” said Narayanan. “Now you can use a model based on a patient’s pathology to simulate the entire surgery before the surgery itself.”

Interest has significantly increased since CBMTI invested in 3D printing and the company has increased production capacity by 40 percent with its 3D printers. A team of 20 medical clinicians, rapid-prototyping engineers, computer programmers, and electrical engineers work together on their main 3D printing lines of business: creating prototypes for university research, developing custom titanium implants and manufacturing custom simulators for surgical training.

“Researchers’ interest in our models has increased a hundredfold since we began using these printers,” said Balakrishnan. “Stratasys printers are the ideal platform for innovation. We have gone from being only able to mold titanium plates for cranial implants to being able to create bio-models with pathology from actual patient imaging data.

3D printed patient-specific models for surgical planning.

Industry leaders in medical modelling.

A recent program was developed to train surgeons on ear, nose and throat surgeries in collaboration with Professor Prepageran Narayanan from theUniversity of Malaysia.“When you use a 3D model with a tumor or lesion, it is very important to have color. Only if you see the color separation do you know that you’re in the right plane,” said Narayanan. “Now you can use a model based on a patient’s pathology to simulate the entire surgery before the surgery itself.”

Interest has significantly increased since CBMTI invested in 3D printing and the company has increased production capacity by 40 percent with its 3D printers. A team of 20 medical clinicians, rapid-prototyping engineers, computer programmers, and electrical engineers work together on their main 3D printing lines of business: creating prototypes for university research, developing custom titanium implants and manufacturing custom simulators for surgical training.

“Researchers’ interest in our models has increased a hundredfold since we began using these printers,” said Balakrishnan. “Stratasys printers are the ideal platform for innovation. We have gone from being only able to mold titanium plates for cranial implants to being able to create bio-models with pathology from actual patient imaging data.

고객사례 다운로드
다운로드